Fact Sheet Display

David Grant USAF Medical Center - Mental Health Clinic

The interdisciplinary treatment team evaluates a patient for treatment Oct. 17 at the medical health clinic. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Liliana Moreno)

The interdisciplinary treatment team evaluates a patient for treatment Oct. 17 at the medical health clinic. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Liliana Moreno)

Captain Heather Bautista (standing) and Lieutenant Commander William Satterfield, checks the operation of a virtual reality software for returning veterans with combat post traumatic stress disorder at the David Grant USAF Medical Center at Travis Air Force Base, Calif., April 17. Capt. Bautista, U.S. Air Force and LCDR. Satterfield, U.S. Public Health Service are assigned to the center's mental health clinic. (U.S. Air Force photo/Lance Cheung)

Captain Heather Bautista (standing) and Lieutenant Commander William Satterfield, checks the operation of a virtual reality software for returning veterans with combat post traumatic stress disorder at the David Grant USAF Medical Center at Travis Air Force Base, Calif., April 17. Capt. Bautista, U.S. Air Force and LCDR. Satterfield, U.S. Public Health Service are assigned to the center's mental health clinic. (U.S. Air Force photo/Lance Cheung)

Mock M-16, therapist manual and a package of various odor concentrations used with virtual reality simulation software at David Grant Medical Center's Mental Health Clinic uses integrated motion inducing platform, headphones, cued smells generator, mock M-16 with directional controls / game controller and virtual reality visor work together to help Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veterans with combat post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The software, introduced to eight bases in the Air Force, is designed to create a safe environment for redeployers with PTSD to recreate a traumatic situation they have experienced. By talking about the their experience people build details to the simulation.  Little by little, they gain a better understanding of the traumatic experience. The VR technology compliments the evidence-based treatment known as 'Prolonged Exposure Therapy' and other research proven approaches are used here to help deployers live a normal life.  David Grant USAF Medical Center at Travis AFB, California is the Air Force's largest medical facility on the West coast. Serving military beneficiaries throughout eight western states. DGMC is the second largest inpatient Military Treatment Facility in the United States Air Force, providing a full spectrum of care to 81,991 eligible beneficiaries, and 400,000 Veterans Administration's Northern California Health Care System eligible population.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Lance Cheung)

Mock M-16, therapist manual and a package of various odor concentrations used with virtual reality simulation software at David Grant Medical Center's Mental Health Clinic uses integrated motion inducing platform, headphones, cued smells generator, mock M-16 with directional controls / game controller and virtual reality visor work together to help Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veterans with combat post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The software, introduced to eight bases in the Air Force, is designed to create a safe environment for redeployers with PTSD to recreate a traumatic situation they have experienced. By talking about the their experience people build details to the simulation. Little by little, they gain a better understanding of the traumatic experience. The VR technology compliments the evidence-based treatment known as 'Prolonged Exposure Therapy' and other research proven approaches are used here to help deployers live a normal life. David Grant USAF Medical Center at Travis AFB, California is the Air Force's largest medical facility on the West coast. Serving military beneficiaries throughout eight western states. DGMC is the second largest inpatient Military Treatment Facility in the United States Air Force, providing a full spectrum of care to 81,991 eligible beneficiaries, and 400,000 Veterans Administration's Northern California Health Care System eligible population. (U.S. Air Force photo/Lance Cheung)

This week's Airman's Roll Call focuses on post traumatic stress disorder and its affects on Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Luke Borland)

This week's Airman's Roll Call focuses on post traumatic stress disorder and its affects on Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Luke Borland)


DGMC's Mental Health Clinic offers a variety of services including crisis intervention, individual counseling, group therapy, psycho-educational skill training, outreach and prevention, and consultation to commanders. Help is available for a variety of concerns including anxiety, depression, grief, stress from deployment (any phase of the deployment cycle), and care for more severe mental illness diagnoses.

No referrals are needed, but the individual wanting assistance must make their own appointment. Priority is given to active duty from any service (including Guard and Reserve), then families of deployed members, and on a space available for retirees and their family members. All providers have been trained in evidence-based treatments for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, PTSD, and treatment may include the use of computer assisted Virtual Reality interventions.

Please download our intake forms to get a full understanding of our privacy guidelines/informed consent to treatment, and the information you need to complete before seeing your counselor:
 
Mental Health Clinic Information Sheet 

Additional Resources:
Defense Center of Excellence Outreach Center (PTSD and Psychological Health)
1-866-966-1020

Military OneSource Wounded Warrior Resource Call Center 
1-800-342-9647

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 
1-800-273-TALK (8255)

National Institute of Mental Health 

Deployment Related Information:
After Deployment 
Real Warriors 
Leader's Guide to Managing Personnel in Distress