Fact Sheet Display

David Grant USAF Medical Center - Aeromedical Staging Facility

Maj. (Dr.) Alaric LeBaron, 60th Medical Surgical Operations Squadron, and Capt. Cindy Bond, 60th Inpatient Squadron critical care nurse, assist in unloading a Standard Mannequin “patient” from a KC-135 Stratotanker July 13. Members of the Critical Care Air Transport Team participated in the practice flight to get extra practice transporting critical care patients. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kristen Rohrer)

Maj. (Dr.) Alaric LeBaron, 60th Medical Surgical Operations Squadron, and Capt. Cindy Bond, 60th Inpatient Squadron critical care nurse, assist in unloading a Standard Mannequin “patient” from a KC-135 Stratotanker July 13. Members of the Critical Care Air Transport Team participated in the practice flight to get extra practice transporting critical care patients. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kristen Rohrer)

OVER THE PACIFIC OCEAN (AFPN) -- Medical technicians Staff Sgt. K.C. Martin (left) and Senior Airman Courtney Johnson practice their advanced cardiac life support skills on a dummy. The training took place aboard a KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft leaving Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Sergeant Martin and Airman Johnson are with the 349th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron at Travis Air Force Base, Calif. They took part in three days of training at the Marine base. The tanker is from the Reserve's 939th Air Refueling Wing at Portland International Airport, Ore. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Ruby Zarzyczny)

OVER THE PACIFIC OCEAN (AFPN) -- Medical technicians Staff Sgt. K.C. Martin (left) and Senior Airman Courtney Johnson practice their advanced cardiac life support skills on a dummy. The training took place aboard a KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft leaving Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Sergeant Martin and Airman Johnson are with the 349th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron at Travis Air Force Base, Calif. They took part in three days of training at the Marine base. The tanker is from the Reserve's 939th Air Refueling Wing at Portland International Airport, Ore. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Ruby Zarzyczny)

The 60th Aeromedical Staging Flight works as a team to get military patients on board the ambulance bus as comfortably as possible. More than 2,500 U.S. military members wounded in Afghanistan and Iraq have passed through Travis to receive aid from the 60th Aeromedical Staging Flight at David Grant USAF Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matt McGovern/60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs)

The 60th Aeromedical Staging Flight works as a team to get military patients on board the ambulance bus as comfortably as possible. More than 2,500 U.S. military members wounded in Afghanistan and Iraq have passed through Travis to receive aid from the 60th Aeromedical Staging Flight at David Grant USAF Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matt McGovern/60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs)

Airmen 1st Class Lauren Sullivan, 60th Aerospace Medicine Squadron aerospace medical service apprentice, comforts Army Sgt. Rudy Saavedra on the way to David Grant USAF Medical Center’s Aeromedical Staging Flight. On Aug. 28, Sergeant Saavedra was supporting a mission in central Iraq when he was sniped by an insurgent. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matt McGovern/60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs)

Airmen 1st Class Lauren Sullivan, 60th Aerospace Medicine Squadron aerospace medical service apprentice, comforts Army Sgt. Rudy Saavedra on the way to David Grant USAF Medical Center’s Aeromedical Staging Flight. On Aug. 28, Sergeant Saavedra was supporting a mission in central Iraq when he was sniped by an insurgent. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matt McGovern/60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs)

Staff Sgt. Kristopher Bradley and Senior Airmen Heather Ducote, 60th Aerospace Medical Squadron medical technicians, transfers a patient from ambulance bus to the unloading arrival/departure lounge. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matt McGovern/60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs)

Staff Sgt. Kristopher Bradley and Senior Airmen Heather Ducote, 60th Aerospace Medical Squadron medical technicians, transfers a patient from ambulance bus to the unloading arrival/departure lounge. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matt McGovern/60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs)

TRAVIS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- First Lt. Sarah Abel tends to the needs of an injured servicemember aboard a C-130 Hercules.  Abel is an ASF clinical nurse from the David Grant Medical Center here.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Jim Spellman)

TRAVIS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Capt. Sarah Abel tends to the needs of an injured servicemember aboard a C-130 Hercules. Abel has served as an ASF clinical nurse at the David Grant Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jim Spellman)


DGMC's Aeromedical Staging Facility has a two-fold mission: To provide support and continuity of medical care for patient movement and serve as an integral link in the Global Aeromedical Evacuation system. The ASF provides personnel and equipment necessary for 24-hour staging operations, patient transportation to aircraft and administratively processes patients transiting the AE system worldwide.

DGMC's Aeromedical Staging Facility is comprised of dedicated and compassionate professionals who specialize in the movement of Aeromedical patients. Our staff consists of the following:

· Two Registered Nurses
· Two Medical Administrators
· 10 Medical Technicians
· A Team of Flight Surgeons, hospital physicians, nurses and support staff

Our Facility:
This facility is one out of three Aeromedical Staging Facilities in the continental United States. The ASF coordinates and communicates with medical and transportation elements within CONUS to accomplish patient care and patient movement, including ground transportation for patients entering, transiting, or leaving the AE system. The ASF is a key healthcare component of the AE or other medical evacuation resources. It provides holding capability for patients transiting the patient movement system. The length of stay in the ASF may be from 24-72 hours.

ASF personnel:
Stage, enplane and deplane patients, receive regulated patients and provide continuing and supportive care, prepare and "clear patients for flight" to ensure suitability for AE under the guidance of the flight surgeon, brief patients and accomplish appropriate documentation and TRAC2ES inputs, provide ground transportation between the ASF and the aircraft and provide facility security for the protection of assets, personnel and entry control. ASFs are responsible for the transportation of patients between their facility and the evacuation asset. Depending upon the patient's needs, a nurse, medical technician, and health service technician (in addition to the driver), plus emergency equipment may accompany patients in an Ambulance Bus (AMBUS), ambulance or vehicles of opportunity according to patient requirements. ASF personnel are also required to load and unload patients on and off aircraft or other evacuation asset.

Nursing Element:
Provides nursing care to all Aeromedical Evacuation patients originating from, transiting through, or terminating their transport at, or by way of, the ASF. Provides hands-on direct patient care and triages, assesses, and re-assesses patients throughout the patient stay. Report all findings to the Charge Nurse and/or physician. Maintains supplies and medical equipment. Actively supports and participates in infection control, environmental safety, patient safety, quality management programs and standards. Functions as preceptor to active duty and reserve medical technicians during their orientation, in-services, and competency assessment. Assist with the annual 250 Bed Expansion Contingency Exercise. Participates in joint patient movement operations. Participates in assigned committee activities and performs as a team member during medical readiness activities.

Operations Element:
Performs duties of preparing inbound and outbound mission folders (AF Form 3835) for the live aeromedical evacuation missions. Coordinates with base agencies to ensure timely launch of C-130, C-17, KC-135 and opportune aircraft arriving from CONUS and overseas missions. Inputs information into the TRANSCOM Regulating and Command & Control Evacuation System (TRAC2ES) to insure patients are regulated through the Aeromedical Evacuation System in a timely manner. Monitors ASF resources, to include vehicles, equipment, and non-medical supplies. Provides administrative support to the nursing care of patients and AE operations. Maintains a functional library of current and up to date instructions, pamphlets, operating instructions and other pertinent reference materials required for the daily operation of the ASF and AE Operations and Administration Element.