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Commentary Search

Commentary Comments Updated
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Chief Master Sgt. John Overturf, official photo, U.S. Air Force Unbowed, unbent, unbroken
Full spectrum readiness has been a priority among our Air Force leaders and has translated into countless exercises, numerous training hours in mission-oriented protective posture gear, and realistic scenarios to ensure we are able to respond to any threat anywhere in the world. But what does this really mean if we personally are not at our best? While it is extremely important to be proficient in those skills, if we are not mentally strong and ready, we will never reach the level of readiness we need to be at.
0 6/05
2018
Lt. Col. Taylor Johnston, official photo, U.S. Air Force “That’s just the way we do it” is not a good answer
I’ve been lucky in my career so far to instruct on three different aircraft and serve in the contingency response world. I started off flying C-21As (LearJets) doing distinguished visitor travel, then transitioned to the C-130 E/H doing airland and airdrop missions. I’ve also flown on air-refueling missions. As I transitioned into the C-130 and KC-135, I asked many questions on why the techniques and procedures were a certain way.
0 6/04
2018
U.S. Air Force Airman First Class Mario Hernandez, 60th Medical Operations Squadron aerospace medical technician, practices firing party movements May 18, 2018 at the Honor Guard Building at Travis Air Force Base, Calif. Travis’ Honor Guard covers 45,000 sq. miles to include four National cemeteries, two Veterans Administration cemeteries and every private resting area between. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathon D. A. Carnell) Taking opportunities
Earlier this year, my supervisor asked me, “Hey Carnell, would you mind going to Honor Guard training starting Monday?” My first thoughts were that something must have changed with my wingman’s schedule in our shop. We both intended doing Honor Guard and our leadership chose him to go first. As I had planned on going second, I was not looking forward to the sudden schedule change. My response to my supervisor was, “Yes, ma’am.”
0 5/30
2018
Lt. Col. Heidi Clark, official photo, U.S. Air Force Good, not dumb
A favorite quote of mine is from “Space Balls,” the 1987 movie parody of “Star Wars.” In it, the villain Dark Helmet, says, “Now you see that evil will always triumph, because good is dumb.”
0 5/30
2018
Chief Master Sgt. Marcos Malacara, 60th Medical Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron, poses for an official photo. Malacara believes it's vital Airmen are treated with dignity and respect. (Courtesy Photo) Make a difference in an Airman’s life
I joined the Air Force in 1992 for the financial stability and education benefits because when I graduated high school, I could not afford college.
0 5/29
2018
Chief Master Sgt. Shae Gee, official photo Silent Warriors
Memorial Day is upon us and we observe this holiday in honor of the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Both my grandfathers, who have since passed, served in the Korean War and World War II. It is an honor to know that I am able to serve in the capacity I can because of their contributions.
0 5/23
2018
Default Air Force Logo Taking ownership
I was out for a run with my 5-year-old recently, who was on his bike, when he stopped to pick up a discarded fast food bag. He asked me to carry it until we could find a trash can, and I obliged, of course. As we continued our run/ride, he explained that he wanted to make sure the people on Travis Air Force Base, California, had a nice place to live and work.
0 5/23
2018
official photo Major Nate Hier Four priorities of life
After 22 years of service, I’ve learned a few lessons that help shape who I am, how I approach life, work and what I fall back on when I need a little help figuring out which way to go. We all learn and think differently, but what follows has served me well. I have four basic rules: Work hard, but have fun doing it; take care of yourself physically, mentally and spiritually so you can take care of your family and teammates; control what you can, but don’t waste time and energy worrying about what you can’t. Finally, treat everybody with dignity and respect.
0 5/15
2018
official photo of SMSgt. Richard Hardin Life lesson: Don’t forget family
Like many of you, I am a very proud American and Airman and have always done exactly what has been asked of me through my military career. The U.S. Air Force has given me so much over my 17 years of service that I’ve felt that I owe a debt that I must repay—sometimes blindly. First off, I was recruited for U.S. Air Force Honor Guard duty and earned the honor to be a pallbearer during President Ronald Reagan’s funeral.
0 5/15
2018
Col. Julie Rutherford, official photo, U.S. Air Force Set the example
I recently worked for a general who often told a leadership story about guiding a group of Airmen across a tarmac during the Gulf War while missiles were incoming. I had the opportunity to hear the story numerous times and was struck that I did not have a similar story of overcoming adversity in a combat environment that showed my leadership potential. It made me really consider what moments shaped me as a leader.
0 5/09
2018
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