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Volunteers from the Travis Heritage Center pose for a group photo Sept. 22, 2016 at Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The Travis Heritage Center has a variety of historic airlift aircraft on display, assorted exhibits pertaining to military operations and a picnic area. The Heritage Center also has a Gift shop designed to make your visit a lasting memory. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Charles Rivezzo) Travis Heritage Center changing with volunteer work force
The literal translation of “volunteer Air Force” is a group of people who join the military rather than being conscripted or drafted. Loosely translated, the term means “there’s a job to do and you’re the Airman tasked to do it.” At the Travis Heritage Center at Travis Air Force Base, California, volunteer force describes people who continue to serve the military, but without pay.
0 9/23
2016
Capt. Jared Wahleithner (right) and 1st Lt. Christopher Dempsey, KC-10 Extender pilots with the 70th Air Refueling Squadron, used years of aircrew survival and first aid and buddy care training to help rescue an aircraft crash victim Sept. 17, 2016. The Citizen Airmen were taking part in the annual Clear Lake Splash In at Clear Lake, Calif., when a seaplane crashed during an attempted water landing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken Wright) Reservists rescue aircraft crash victim
If not for the actions of two fast-thinking and well-trained Citizen Airmen, the last Saturday of summer may have ended in tragedy at Clear Lake, California. Capt. Jared Wahleithner and 1st Lt. Chris Dempsey were ferrying passengers to shore Sept. 17, during the annual Clear Lake Seaplane Splash In, when a small amphibious aircraft crashed during an attempted landing.
0 9/23
2016
An inmate from the California Medical Facility shares a personal story about his incarceration and shows a photograph of his children during the time he was imprisoned at CMF, in Vacaville, Calif., Sept. 15, 2016. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Charles Rivezzo) True North: Travis JAG bolsters preventative law program
As part of an effort to bolster the 60th Air Mobility Wing Legal Office’s preventative law program and curb Travis Air Force Base’s recent trend of elevated nonjudicial punishment and courts-martial proceedings in recent years, Travis officials developed a new program to confront Airmen in a more unorthodox approach.
0 9/19
2016
Staff Sgt. Angel Ramirez Arenas (Left), 60th Logistical Readiness Squadron NCO in charge of fleet management, poses for a photo with his brother, Senior Airman Ramon Ramirez Arenas (Right), 60th Surgical Operations Squadron surgical technician, at Travis Air Force Base, Calif., Sept. 7, 2016. The brothers from Compton, Calif., have been assigned to TAFB for almost two years and have nearly a decade of military service between them. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. James Hodgman) Brothers join forces at Travis
Approximately one percent of Americans have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. An even smaller percentage have served within the same family, at the same time, at the same base. This is a reality for the Ramirez Arenas brothers from Compton, California. The brothers, who are nearly six years apart, both serve on active-duty at Travis Air Force Base,
0 9/16
2016
Staff Sgt. Chester Rafan,60th Air Mobility Wing military justice paralegal, poses for a photo Sept. 13 inside the courtroom at Travis Air Force Base, Calif. Rafan, as a paralegal, drafts Article 15s, prepares for courts martial and other cases on behalf of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Amber Carter) Time as MTL helps shape sergeant for job in JA
Every Airman has their own reason for joining the Air Force and each Airman takes a different path after joining the military. Some stay in the same career field and some cross train to a new one. Each path is as unique as each person wearing the uniform. Staff Sgt. Chester Rafan, 60th Air Mobility Wing military justice paralegal, joined to provide for his wife and four children, and his journey, so far, has taken him from civil engineering to paralegal with a special duty as a Military Training Leader in between.
0 9/15
2016
Default Air Force Logo 821st CRSS stands ready to work at all hours
The men and women of the 821st Contingency Response Support Squadron, or CRSS, stand ready 24/7/365, on a 12-hour deployment notice, to support Air Mobility Command, the Air Force and United States Transportation Command with highly qualified and versatile contingency response Airmen.
0 9/08
2016
Airman 1st Class Benjamin Morris, 821st Contingency Response Squadron aerial porter, poses for a photograph at Travis Air Force Base, Calif., Spet. 6, 2016. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Robert Hicks) Airman spends life building planes
When someone explains their love for aircraft, you expect to hear stories of their first experience of an F-22 Raptor roaring down the runway or an A-10 Thunderbolt screeching through the sky, not an F-4 Phantom soaring through the air with a tight grasp of the hand and the smacking of the lips to mimic engine rumble.
0 9/08
2016
Emily Haley, 60th Air Mobility Wing community support coordinator. Haley heads programs to help Travis hearts, minds
If a program at Travis Air Force Base, California, is helping people, Emily Haley probably has a hand in it or knows about it. Haley, 60th Air Mobility Wing community support coordinator, works with so many intertwining base agencies that it’s difficult to know where one ends and another begins.
0 9/01
2016
Master Sgt. Robin Debaghy, 60th Air Mobility Wing superintendent of protocol, makes sure the flags are positioned correctly for an Air Force event Aug. 25 at Travis Air Force Base, California. Details such as flag placement, where each person should sit at a table and little-known requirements are taken care of by Protocol specialists to ensure events are following proper protocol. Protocol: Little office with big mission
If you have ever attended a formal Air Force event, such as a promotion ceremony or an induction ceremony, you may have noticed how an ordinary room can be changed into a well-decorated, perfectly put together space for a special occasion. The Protocol office at Travis Air Force Base, California, is a small team of four detail-oriented, outgoing individuals who work behind the scenes to make sure each important event goes off without a hitch.
0 9/01
2016
Airman 1st Class Benjamin Clifton, 60th IPTS surgical inpatient medical technician, poses for a photo Aug. 23 at Travis Air Force Base, California. Medical technician takes charge in life, patient care
When talking about Airman 1st Class Benjamin Clifton, 60th Inpatient Squadron surgical inpatient flight medical technician, Master Sgt. Mark Baldwin gushes with enthusiasm. So what does he bring to the team? “What doesn’t he bring to the team?” said Baldwin, 60th Inpatient Squadron surgical inpatient flight chief, with a laugh. “Clifton just brings it every day, all day, and doesn’t hesitate to get anything done. … He’s just my rock star.”
0 8/25
2016
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