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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Shayla LaFlamme, 60th Medical Group, Travis Air Force Base, Calif., researches information for her presentation during the Transdisciplinary Evidence Based Practice Conference at NorthBay Healthcare Medical Center, Fairfield, Calif., April 13, 2018. The goal of the Transdisciplinary Evidence Based Practice Conference is to improve care based on clinical expertise, patient preference, and evidence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese) David Grant USAF Medical Center hosts first ever evidence-based practice symposium
Medical professionals from David Grant USAF Medical Center, NorthBay Healthcare, Air Force Medical Service and Ohio State University gathered for a weeklong conference on evidence-based practice. The conference gathers medical professionals from all disciplines and teaches them how to collect information and data on the best proven ways to take care of patients.
0 4/24
2018
Former airline pilot Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger III flies with the United States Air Force Thunderbirds at Travis Air Force Base, Calif., May 4, 2017. Sullenberger is a 1973 Air Force Academy graduate and is best known for successfully landing a crippled airliner in the Hudson River saving the lives of a 155 passengers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese) Travis plays host to many DV visits
While every installation hosts distinguished visitors, Travis Air Force Base, Califonria, has become a hub for many DVs traveling to the Pacific. Whether it’s a cabinet secretary, politician or military leader, Travis has recently seen them all.
0 11/15
2017
Capt. Kendra Alanis, 60th Medical Operations Squadron clinical nurse, poses for a photo in the hematology/oncology clinic Oct. 24, 2017 at Travis Air Force Base, California. Alanis provides therapeutic and consultative services to the patients she supports. (Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathon D. A. Carnell) Hematology/Oncology clinic provide care
Travis Air Force Base, Calif. – The oncology and hematology staff members at David Grant USAF Medical Center at Travis Air Force Base, California, emphasize competence, communication and compassion. Focusing on safety and effectiveness is important to the professionals who work to help those in need of their services.
0 10/24
2017
Staff Sgt. Sony K. Luangphone, 60th Operations Support Squadron air traffic control landing systems technician, optimizes line levels for radio frequencies Oct. 24 on Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The radio technology employed by the 60th OSS allowed pilots and emergency personnel to reach their destinations in the safest and most efficient manner so as to deliver aid to those devastated by the recent natural disasters. 60th OSS: Working under the radar
“In a way, the [Operations Support Squadron] is this sort of clandestine element,” said Staff Sgt. Sony K. Luangphone, 60th Operations Support Squadron air traffic control landing systems technician. “If you don’t hear about us, it means we’re doing a good job. It’s the nature of our job to work behind the scenes to ensure that those frontline Airmen who are deploying have a reliable means to carry out their mission in the event that a disaster strikes.”
0 10/24
2017
Default Air Force Logo Air Force trauma surgeons stay current at UC Davis Medical Center
On a day-to-day basis he provides medical care for civilian pediatric patients. But when the Air Force calls, he swaps his white coat and scrubs for the Airman battle uniform to hop on a military aircraft headed anywhere to treat critically injured service members.
0 10/24
2017
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