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David Grant USAF Medical Center - Hyperbaric Medicine Department

Lt. Col. (Dr.) Michael Richards and Tech. Sgt Christain Simpson help patients attach oxygen-providing hoods prior to a dive in the hyperbaric chamber at David Grant Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Lt. Col. (Dr.) Michael Richards and Tech. Sgt Christain Simpson help patients attach oxygen-providing hoods prior to a dive in the hyperbaric chamber at David Grant Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Patients at David Grant Medical Center relax prior to a dive in the hospital's hyperbaric chamber. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Patients at David Grant Medical Center relax prior to a dive in the hospital's hyperbaric chamber. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Tech. Sgt. James Colvin, the 60th Medical Group's Aerospace Physiology flight chief, moves through a pre-dive checklist at the hyperbaric chamber console. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Tech. Sgt. James Colvin, the 60th Medical Group's Aerospace Physiology flight chief, moves through a pre-dive checklist at the hyperbaric chamber console. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

1st Lt. Andrea Deoliveira, a 60th Medical Group Aerospace Physiology nurse, waits inside the hyperbaric chamber with her patients minutes before a dive. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

1st Lt. Andrea Deoliveira, a 60th Medical Group Aerospace Physiology nurse, waits inside the hyperbaric chamber with her patients minutes before a dive. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Patient Heather Leath prepares for another dive in the hyperbaric chamber at David Grant Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Patient Heather Leath prepares for another dive in the hyperbaric chamber at David Grant Medical Center. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Gauges and monitoring equipment inside and outside the hyperbaric chamber at David Grant Medical Center help staff keep a close eye on the oxygen rich environment produced for patients. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Gauges and monitoring equipment inside and outside the hyperbaric chamber at David Grant Medical Center help staff keep a close eye on the oxygen rich environment produced for patients. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Gauges in the hyperbaric chamber at David Grant Medical Center help staff keep a close eye on the oxygen rich environment produced for patients. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

Gauges in the hyperbaric chamber at David Grant Medical Center help staff keep a close eye on the oxygen rich environment produced for patients. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Ken Wright)

DGMC's Hyperbaric Medicine Department is comprised of devoted and compassionate professionals who specialize in Hyperbaric/Wound Care. Our outpatient staff consists of the following:

· Two Board Certified Undersea & Hyperbaric Physicians
· One Wound Care Nurse
· One Licensed Vocational Nurse
· Three Medical Technicians
· Five Aerospace & Operational Physiology Technicians
· Two Hyperbaric Instrument Mechanics

Our Mission:
Our center provides consultation in hyperbaric medicine and wound care to the medical facility and tenant units as well as conducting research, education, and medical practice in operational and clinical arenas during conflict or peace. The Hyperbaric Medicine facility operates 24/7 worldwide consultative telephone service in support of military operational requirements. We provide state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen therapy to a defined beneficiary population and conducts medical research and clinical investigations to establish optimal treatment protocols. 

What is Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment?
Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment, or HBOT is a medical treatment in which patients inhale intermittent 100 percent oxygen through hoods or masks in chambers pressurized to greater than one atmosphere absolute. The treatment duration and number of required sessions will vary. The typical duration of a wound care treatment dive is two hours.

HBOT has several mechanisms of action, which provide medical benefits. In treating decompression sickness and arterial gas embolism, HBOT helps shrink problematic nitrogen gas bubbles by increasing ambient pressure and by the application of 100 percent oxygen. HBOT has additional benefits: increased blood flow and hyper-oxygenation to ischemic hypoxic tissue; promotes cell growth, new blood vessel formation and collagen deposition; reduces edema; helps fight infection through various enhanced leukocytic functions; and reduces the toxic effects of such poisons as carbon monoxide.

Clinical Information:
 - Urgent Referrals or Physician-to-Physician contact should call (707) 423-3987 and ask to speak with a doctor
 - VA Referrals and Emergencies require pre-authorization via the VA Liaison
 - All non-DOD beneficiaries (civilian) emergencies must be preapproved for hyperbaric treatment via the Chief of Medical Staff

Additional resources:
Feature article: Dive into DGMC's hyperbaric oxygen treatment chamber
Travis Tailwind, Nov. 2, 2012 (page 7)    

Listing of DGMC's Hyperbaric Medicine providers